Fulani Girls

Charlotte:

I just had to share this gorgeous, colorful photo. JuJu Films has some of the most intriguing photography on the internet. You should follow him. (Don’t you wish your posture was this perfect?)
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Originally posted on Juju Films:

Street Hawking | Bwari FCT Nigeria | #JujuFilms #Fulani #Nigeria #StreetHawking

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Hot Reads 8/10/14

From our Pinterest Hot Reads board, a list of our favorite reads on the internet during the past week. Enjoy!

huffpoflapper1. From HuffPo: “Dating in the 1920’s: Lipstick. Booze, and the Origins of Slut Shaming”
Favorite quote: “The new woman of the ’20s was totally different from her mother. She worked and voted. She smoked, drank and danced. She dated. She celebrated her new freedoms in style. She was a flapper.”

2. Also from HuffPo: “The Real “L” Word (Especially in the Bible Belt”) Is….”
(H/T: Part Time Monster)
Favorite quote: “Ministry isn’t always a sermon or a church service. No! Ministry is about loving people — all people. Jesus was radically inclusive. Just look at the woman at the well and the lepers, all considered abominations by the religious people. Jesus loved them, and He included them. That’s what I want to do with The Dandelion Project.”

3. Aaaaand, three times the charm. From HuffPo: “These Are the Things Men Say To Women On the Street”
This is shit that happens when you’re just walking down the street minding your own business. No favorite quote here. The pictures tell the story. huffpo

4. From Humanistic Paganism: “A Pedagogy of Gaia: How Lammas Changed My Life” by New Orleans blogger and activist Bart Everson.
Tagline: What can we learn, and how can we teach, from the cycles of the Earth — both the cycles within us, and the cycles in which we find ourselves?
Favorite Quote: “We may discover unexpected depths and make new connections if we are open to possibilities.”

photo(2)5. From Thought Catalog: “How and Why To Keep a Commonplace Book”
Favorite Quote: “Some of the greatest men and women in history have kept these books. Marcus Aurelius kept one–which more or less became the Meditations. “
Note: I’ve keep one of these little books off and on over the years. Here’s two of my old ones. For me, it’s a creative addition to traditional journaling. Plus, I love quotes.

 

6. From TammyVitale.com: “Things That Strike My Fancy”tammyv
Favorite Quote: “So each new creation we allow to come through us may have been written/sung/painted/danced/spoken before, but in this instance it is filtered through our unique human experience and so it must be something new under the sun. Bayles and Orland, in Art and Fear say: Each new piece of your art enlarges our [everyone' else's] reality. The world is not yet done.”
Note: this is a really great essay on nurturing inspiration in your art and writing.

7. And our list for the week comes from Part Time Monster: “Top Ten Tuesday: Top 10 Books I’d Give to Readers Who Haven’t Read Southern Literature”
A great book list that you should check out. I’d add Mystic Pig by Richard Katrovas,  Atchafalaya Houseboat: My Years in the Louisiana Swamp by Gwen Roland and French Quarter Fiction: The Newest Stories of America’s Oldest Bohemia edited by Joshua Clark.
What book would you add?
8. And finally, great poem of the week is “Don’t You Miss the Phone Booth” by Kate Peper on Rattle. Well, don’t you? If you haven’t thought about it, read this poem. Really.
A little snippet:

Oh, sure, back then it meant people couldn’t reach you 24/7,
photos snapped from your cell at a dinner party couldn’t be sent
to your loved ones in Zurich, or your pre-teen’s thumbs
couldn’t get the workout from texting, but hey—

The Hundred-Foot Journey: A Review

100footFood has the power to evoke memories and emotions. One bite or an elusive whiff can take you back to a certain place and time, to a feeling that resonates in your heart and gut. It can make you nostalgic. Biscuits do that for me. My MaMaw made the best biscuits I’ve ever tasted; big, perfectly round, a light golden brown with a texture so soft it melted on your tongue. They were perfection and I was mad about them. I’ve never had a biscuit that even came close to MaMaw’s. Now, they are only a memory but a powerful one that brings back Sunday dinner at her house with aunts and uncles and family friends eating around her bountiful table and visiting into the late afternoon. I miss it.

The Hundred-Foot Journey is all about food. The physical act of preparing and cooking it, the camaraderie and competition and the love that goes into it. It’s about family and tradition and the  mix of cultures, the teaching and learning and the sharing of those cultures. It’s about how food can grab a hold on your heart (as well as your belly!) and never let go.

Emilie and I attended a pre-release viewing of this film courtesy of The Commanders Family of Restaurants with Chef Tory at The Theatres at Canal Place. I already knew I wanted to see it so I was excited to be invited. It was everything I’d hoped it would be. The cinematography was fantastic from the vibrant colors and textures of India to the sweeping pastoral views of the French countryside to the tantalizing food itself. The food is so integral to this movie it almost eclipses the story of the people who cook it. My mouth watered at the Beef Bourguinon a la Hassan to the Tandoori Chicken (those recipes and more below!) and all the other delectable dishes in between. It made me crave Indian food. It made me want to go to India and France. I’m not a Foodie so I can’t speak to the technical aspects of the food preparation and presentation but as just someone who likes to eat, it was all five star to me! I especially enjoyed the vegetable chopping scene – it was fun to watch.

I felt all the characters were cast perfectly. Helen Mirren (one of my favorite actors) plays an impeccable French matron (to this American). Not only was her accent convincing, her persona exuded French, to me. Her manner of speaking, how she held her body, her fashion style and even her hair all convinced me she was French. The other actors, too, were so convincing I imagined they were exactly who they portrayed.

I’m not going into the particulars of the story since I’m sure most everyone has seen the trailer. (Here it is, if you haven’t.) What I will say is that it was so refreshing to watch a genuinely enjoyable movie with a sweet story that didn’t have a high speed car chase, things exploding, super-heroes or dysfunctional families. It was just a good, solid story that made you laugh, cry, and forget the outside world for a while. That’s something that’s getting more rare every day. The film opens today. Go see it!

Visit the official website for more about the storyline, the characters, and photos.

THFJ_Recipe Cards_Page_6THFJ_Recipe Cards_Page_3imageimageimageimage

Hot Reads

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: I love Pinterest. I think there are a lot of people out there who think Pinterest is for housewives to post recipes and baby stuff but it’s so much more! The idea of a virtual bulletin board is so much fun and that’s what Pinterest is. There’s so much I run across on the internet that I want to keep. In the past I’ve used Delicious and Instapaper which are good sites in their own way but I rarely went back to look for anything I kept there. I don’t use them anymore because I’ve started using Pocket where I’ve been very diligent about proper and useful tagging so I can find something when I want it. So far, so good. But the thing I love about Pinterest is the dominant visual aspect of it which makes it so easy to find stuff. I’m a very visual person and Pinterest is perfect for cataloging the gorgeous photography and art that I love, for giving me the push to try that new recipe (yes!) that I saved that looks so damn good. (See previous post!) It’s great for so many things and now I’ve started a new board which is what this post is about.

On my personal Pinterest account I’ve started a “Hot Reads From NOLAFemmes.com” board. I’ve been keeping articles from the internet that grab me on Pocket since I opened the account but I really like, again, the visual aspect of Pinterest that helps to pique your attention. These are pieces I want to share with our readers so I hope you’ll follow and enjoy the board. I also plan to try to post my Hot Reads here every week (or so) with a link to the board.

So what were my Hot Reads last week? I thought you’d never ask!

hotreads11. From Mother Jones, “Lidia Yuknavitch Flicks Off Frued.
Tagline: An irreverent remake of a renowned case, the new novel “Dora: a Headcase” delivers a gritty take on girlhood.
My favorite quote: “I want to create new girl myths,” she says of Dora. “Instead of always talking about how women struggle in the face of certain models, what if we spent more energy highlighting all these great other possible girl-paths, and turned away from the dominant culture?”

2. The Wall Street Journal: “Maggie Gyllenhaal on The Honorable Woman.”hotreads2
Tagline: Just as war in Israel and Gaza fills the news, a drama on SundanceTV explores the region’s turmoil.
My favorite quote: “Behind my intention in making this is compassion and, maybe it’s naive, a belief in the possibility of reconciliation, which our show never takes off the table.”
Note: I watched the premiere of this series and it’s looking really promising.

3. From The New York Times, “Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminism.”
Tagline: The author speaks with Jessica Gross about her favorite definition of feminism, ‘‘Sweet Valley High’’ and the fetishization of bad writing.hotreads3
My favorite quote: “I think that narrative is a fetish among faculty, not a reality. They fetishize the idea of bad writing, and they are more interested in the lore of bitching about students’ writing than they are in actually evaluating students’ writing as it is.”
Note: Gay’s Bad Feminist comes out this week and I can’t wait to get my pre-ordered copy!

4. From HuffPo, 8 Great New Books By Women You Should Definitely Readhotreads4
Every Hot Reads list has to have a book list and this is the one that intrigues me the most.
Maddie Crum begins by saying, “2014 has been deemed the Year of Reading Women. I wholeheartedly support this movement; after all, only diminutive steps have been made towards gender parity in the literary world since the institution of VIDA’s annual book review count (with the notable exception of the New York Times book review, which bounded towards equal coverage in just one year).”
I say, Yep! Read women! And follow the Twitter feed.

hotreads55. From Brain Pickings, Vacation Sex: A Poem by Dorianne Laux
Every Hot Reads list MUST include a great poem and this is a great poem and a great way to end the list. The piece includes text and video and, damn, who doesn’t want to read about vacation sex?

F.E.D. —> Blueberry Crumb Bars

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Fast. Easy. Delicious. That’s what I look for in a recipe. I admire adventurous cooks and the love they put into recipes with a lengthy list of ingredients but that’s just not me. When I get the itch to bake I love it when I have all the ingredients on hand in my pantry and I don’t have to spend dollars on (and time looking for)  items I’ve never heard of and will likely never use again. I’ve been going crazy on blueberries this summer and it seems there’s an abundance of them in the supermarket looking plump and juicy and tempting me on every trip there. Most of the time I eat them raw in plain yogurt or in vanilla ice cream but when I saw this recipe I decided it was time to get out the flour and sugar and bake it up. This recipe fits the requirements of Fast. Easy. Delicious. It’s yummy either warm or cold, eaten as is or under a creamy topping of vanilla ice cream. Perfect for picnics and backyard barbeques, it’s not too sweet allowing the fresh taste of the blueberries to dominate. It’s a keeper.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup sugar, divided
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 cups blueberries
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (I always use self-rising flour because I always have it on hand. Just skip the baking power and salt.)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into cubes
 

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly coat an 8×8 baking dish with nonstick spray.
  • In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup sugar and cornstarch. Stir in lemon juice. Add blueberries and gently toss to combine; set aside.
  • In a large bowl, combine flour, remaining 1/2 cup sugar, baking powder and salt. Add egg yolk, vanilla, lemon zest and cold butter, using your fingers to work the butter into the dry ingredients until it resembles coarse crumbs.
  • Spread 2/3 of the batter into the prepared baking dish. Spread blueberry mixture evenly over the bottom layer. Sprinkle with remaining 1/3 of the batter and turbinado sugar.
  • Place into oven and bake until lightly browned, about 35-40 minutes. Let cool slightly before cutting into bars.

Enjoy!
Recipe via Damn Delicious

“It’s boring to play the girl role.”

This is a good video of Olivia Wilde speaking and participating in a panel on “The State of Female Justice 2014: What Makes You Rise?” “The State of Female Justice” panels bring women from diverse movements together for a shared public conversation about justice and equity. In this short video (4 minutes, 2 seconds), Olivia talks about why women aren’t being empowered by the media and shares a story about an acting exercise she participated in that’s very interesting. Enjoy.

More about “The State of a Female Justice” here.