Hot Reads 10/19/14

photo via hitfix.com

photo via hitfix.com

I’ve been reading quite a bit about feminism and what it means to be a Feminist in today’s world. I think Beyonce’s spectacular performance at the VMA’s a while back helped bring feminism back into the spotlight and sparked some thought and conversation on the subject. The first article on my list is by – who else? – Roxane Gay. And, as is normally the way, I completely agree with her pov. The following two articles from HuffPo are pretty good lists of helpful ideas on how to raise a feminist child.

We’ve also got a New Englander espousing on what makes a true New Englander (sound familiar, New Orleanians?), the reminiscing of a former beauty pageant contestant, and a few other sundry pieces that I enjoyed in the past two weeks along with the featured book list and poem. So without further ado…..

From The Guardian: Emma Watson? Jennifer Lawrence? These aren’t the feminists you’re looking for.
Favorite quote: “This is the real problem feminism faces. Too many people are willfully ignorant about what the word means and what the movement aims to achieve. But when a pretty young woman has something to say about feminism, all of a sudden, that broad ignorance disappears or is set aside because, at last, we have a more tolerable voice proclaiming the very messages feminism has been trying to impart for so damn long.”

From HuffPo: 25 Feminist Lessons for My Sons and 32 Feminist Lessons for my Daughter
Favorite quotes:  (From “Sons”) “It is up to us to ensure that the lessons of feminism and gender equality (and all kinds of equality, for that matter) are so deeply rooted in our family’s core that they leak out slowly and constantly — during playdates and in sports and, yes, in the kitchen while we put away the dinner dishes.”
(From “Daughter”) “You may have the right to vote, access to birth control and the ability to date who you want, but it wasn’t always this way. Women fought and died for these rights you currently enjoy. And your generation has its own struggles carved out to fight.”

photo via luna luna

photo via luna luna

 

From Luna Luna Magazine: I’m a Recovering Teenage Beauty Queen
Favorite quote: “To think that in this day and age, beauty contests still haven’t been laughed out of existence worries me. What could a contestant possibly learn from her experience? Whether she wins or loses, the lesson is clear: either you are superior or inferior to another female. She is your enemy. And value, recognition and, of course, beauty, are the prizes for beating her. There is no shared crown. No camaraderie. No sisterhood.”

 

From shebooks: Lee Montgomery: New Englanders Don’t Write Blogs (and 20 other things you never knew about the Northeast)
Favorite quote: “New Englanders do not wear those fat rimmed cordoroys, khakis, or Izod shirts. A true New Englander would not be caught dead in penny loafers.”
Note: When I ran across this article I just had to read it because what makes a true New Orleanian comes up locally all the time. I see it on social media and hear it in conversation so often it’s getting to be an eye roll moment for me. But, apparently, it goes on in other parts of the country too and that’s what made this read so fascinating for me. Plus, I know absolutely nothing about the Northeast. I thought they all wore penny loafers up there.

From The Daily Beast: Diane von Furstenberg: Becoming the Woman She Wanted To Be  (hat tip to Grace Athas via FaceBook)
Favorite quote: “I didn’t used to talk nearly as much about my mother. I took her for granted, as children do their mothers. It was not until she died in 2000 that I fully realized what an incredibly huge influence she had been on me and how much I owe her.”

From Longreads: Interview: Vela Magazine Founder Sarah Menkedick on Women Writers and Sustainable Publishing
Favorite quote: “I am of the persuasion that the great democratizing force of the internet is a fantastic thing for young writers, women writers, writers who’ve historically been excluded from the conversation.”
Note: Yes! Yes! Yes!

From On Books and Writing: 2 Things I Learned Reading Only Books by Women for a Month

image via englishpen.org

image via englishpen.org

Favorite quote: “I didn’t realize it at the time, but there seems to be a default switch in my head that goes to white male authors, and I think/fear that it may also be this way for others (How else do you explain the permanent space Patterson/King/Grisham/Child/Brown seem to have at the top of bestseller lists?).”

From The Rumpus: The Rumpus Interview With “Women in Clothes”
Favorite quote: “I think my sense of my family was that we had no culture, that we were culture-less. I was always seeking other people and other families that seemed to have much more defined, inherited, passed-down culture than mine did. Of course, looking back, that’s completely incorrect. And doing this book—in a way it makes me able to see my own family with a bit more clarity, because it seems to be maybe invisible to you at first.”
Note: Since I recently read this book (my review here) I really enjoyed reading this and gaining a little more insight into their thinking and the logistics of gathering information from the participants.

photo via bonjourparis.com

Featured Booklist from Finding Time to Write: Books Set in Paris.
Because who wouldn’t want to read a book set in Paris selected by a French blogger who’s a damn fine writer herself? Thanks, Marina Sofia!

 

 

Photo credit: Charlotte Hamrick

Photo credit: Charlotte Hamrick

Poem of the week is “Nine Ways of Shaping the Moon” by Robert Okaji, a romantic, sweet poem that I just love.

 

Nine Ways of Shaping the Moon
– for Lissa

1
Tilt your head and laugh
until the night bends
and I see only you.

2
Weave the wind into song.
Rub its fabric over your skin.
For whom does it speak?

3
Remove all stars and streetlights.
Remove thought, remove voice.
Remove me. But do not remove yourself.

4
Tear the clouds into threads
and place them in layered circles.
Then breathe slowly into my ear.

5
Drink deeply. Raise your eyes to the brightness
above the cedars. Observe their motion
through the empty glass. Repeat.

6
Talk music to me. Talk conspiracies
and food and dogs and rain. Do this
under the wild night sky.

7
Harvest red pollen from the trees.
Cast it about the room
and look through the haze.

8
From the bed, gaze into the mirror.
The reflection you see is the darkness
absorbing your glow.

9
Fold the light around me, and listen.
You are the moon in whose waters
I would gladly drown.

________________________________________________

And, speaking of poems, I’m very excited to have four of mine up at The Poetry Storehouse, an outstanding website featuring new and established poets and beautiful video poems by talented remixers. Check it out!

Have a great reading week and don’t forget to follow our Hot Reads board on Pinterest.

Book Review: “Women in Clothes”

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“We are always asking for something when we get dressed. Asking to be loved, . . . to be admired, to be left alone, to make people laugh, to scare people, to look wealthy, to say I’m poor, I love myself.” — 28 year old participant

 

This book is not at all what you expect it will be. When my friend, Harriet, gave me this book I immediately thought “fashion book” which meant, to me, how to dress either for the (upwardly mobile) working world or the fashion world or, maybe, how to dress like one of those many Housewives of Whatever City from those (so-called) “reality” shows. But when I began thumbing through it I saw that the book didn’t appear to be any of those things. It looked quite interesting. And it is.

‘Women in Clothes,’ by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits, Leanne Shapton and over 600 participating women of diverse nationalities and ages is a collaborative wonderland exploring every attitude, judgement, or question about clothes and our relationships to them that you can think of and some you can’t . The book is 514 pages that passed through my fingers rather quickly because almost everything written in it is fascinating. Some of the content is the result of surveys completed by all kinds of women: artists, writers, mothers, activists, students, garment-workers, soldiers, transgendered women, religious women, and many others. You’ll find essays, interviews, poetry, visual collections, snippets of street conversation, and all kinds of other media. I really feel inadequate trying to describe this book so I’ll share some of the chapters and some quotes I flagged while reading it. That should give you an idea of what’s inside this book.

Mothers As Others, Parts 1 & 2 – Participants share a photo of their mother before she had children and tell us what they see. I loved this chapter.

I Do Care About Your Party by Um Adam – Um talks about her clothing style which is wearing a jilbab (loose pants and a long,very loose shirt) and hijab. She talks about what dressing like this means to her in terms of respect for her body and her religion. She says, “God made no mistakes when He made me. He made me perfect. Sorry if I sound arrogant or overconfident, but I am confident about my appearance. Why wouldn’t I be? I was created by the most perfect – my Lord- in perfection, and I don’t need any man, clothing designer, or makeup artist to tell me what is perfect.”

If Nothing Else, I Have an Ethical Garter – Interview with Mac McCelland, Human Rights Journalist – She talks about the textile industry, warehouse and factory workers, and how her work influences her choice of clothing. She also talks about how she doesn’t like to own much stuff. She says, “Then I have some weird disaster issues, like I lived in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. To me, things that you have are just things you will lose or could lose, so don’t get attached to them.”

Handmade – Participants talk about making their own clothes or re-purposing clothes. Also about women in their families who sewed their own clothing and that of their families’. I liked this comment by Rachel Kushner (author of “The Flamethrowers”, a book I really liked) especially: “My  mother is a southern Protestant beatnik who wove see-through tank tops on her loom and wore homemade pleather hot pants. No bra, never shaved her legs. She has waist-length bright red hair. DIY was instilled in me, I guess.”

This Person Is a Robot – “A smell scientist sniffs coats in a busy New York City restaurant’s coat-check closet.”  Hilarious!

The Pant Suit Rotation – Interview with Alex Wagner, Journalist and TV Anchor – On the disparity between how men on TV dress and how women on TV are expected to dress.

The Mom Coat by Amy Fusselman – Well, I’m not a mom but I found this essay so interesting and insightful into a world I’ve never inhabited. She says, “The Mom Coat is a sleeping bag you walk around in. It turns you into a pod. I almost cease to be human when I wear it: I am just a shroud with pockets. And, of course, because I have kids, my pockets are always stuffed with Kleenex, hair clips, Goldfish, et cetera. The Mom Coat is like a minivan in that way. You are inside and piloting a receptacle for your kids’ stuff.”

In between essays, there will be chapters dedicated to answers from the survey questions such as “Women Looking at Women”, “Protection”, “Sisters”, and “Do You Consider Yourself Photogenic?” The myriad answers entertained, educated, and surprised me.

There are pages dedicated to a series of items (collections) belonging to individual women such as “Gwen Smith’s concert tee shirts”, “Tara Washington’s knitted hats”, and “Tift Merritt’s handmade guitar straps”. Some of the collections are kind of lame (“floss sticks used over the course of a week” – really?) but most are interesting.

I love that there is no striving for perfection in this book. Every woman is allowed to be herself, to express her own unique style and personality in her own way without apology in this eclectic and satisfyingly original book. It’s like having a conversationn with 639 different women and never getting bored.

“Rompers are not ever going to be on my body.” — Roxane Gay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hot Reads 9/7/14

Women, women, women. In retrospect it seems that last week my reading was all about women and all the myriad ways they think, feel and engage in this world. I think I have a really great line-up of articles to share. Enjoy!

Photo via The Guardian

Photo via The Guardian

From The Guardian: Mary J Blige interview: ‘The UK is a better place to make music than the States’
Tagline: The soul singer talks about her month in London making an album with the cream of British talent including Disclosure, Naughty Boy and Sam Smith – and why she just had to meet Mitch Winehouse.
Favorite quote: “When I’m singing, I don’t think about anything but what I’m doing. I could look crazy in that moment, it doesn’t matter to me. I’m just trying to get all this stuff out. Because it feels good to get it out. It feels good to sing. It’s like you can fly almost, when you singing that stuff.”

From The Washington Post: Being informed and fashionable is natural for women.
Favorite quote: “Is it so inconceivable that a smart, accomplished woman would have both the latest issue of the Economist and the second season of “The Mindy Project” downloaded on her iPad? Sorry, but modern women see no contradiction there.”

Photo via Goodreads

Photo via Goodreads

 

From The Rumpus: Interview with Maya Angelou by New Orleanian Whitney Mackman
Favorite quote: “I don’t expect negative, and when I find it, I run like hell and holler “fire!”

 

 

 

From Slate: That Screaming Lady
Tagline: Lena Dunham, Jill Soloway, and other funny women on what Joan Rivers meant to them.
Favorite quote: “She ran at comedy full-tilt and punched a hole so big that any girl who wanted to give it a try could walk right through.”

Photo via Slate

Photo via Slate

From The Daily Mail UK: Margaret Atwood on being called offensive and man-hating
Tagline: Almost 30 years after the publication of The Handmaid’s Tale, her work has lost none of its ability to unsettle.

Favorite quote: ‘Social media was supposed to make us all aware of one another’s point of view, but it self-sorts,’ she says.‘People turn off anything they don’t already like and only pay attention to people who agree with them. That can be very polarising.’

 

From The Daily Mail UK: The Secret Torment of Joni Mitchell
Tagline: Unflinching insight into the reclusive 70s icon’s battles with a disease that makes her skin crawl, is haunted by stalkers and the heartache of giving her daughter up for adoption.
Favorite quote: “I’d come through such a rough, tormented period as a destitute, unwed mother. It was like you killed somebody. I had some serious battles for a twenty-one-year-old.”

From Brain Pickings: Famous Writers on the Creative Benefits of Keeping a Diary
Tagline: Reflections on the value of recording our inner lives from Woolf, Thoreau, Sontag, Emerson, Nin, Plath, and more.
Favorite quote: “We are creatures of remarkable moodiness and mental turbulence, and what we think we believe at any given moment — those capital-T Truths we arrive at about ourselves and the world — can be profoundly different from our beliefs a decade, a year, and sometimes even a day later.”

From Luna Luna Magazine: Gossip as a Mean of Bonding
Favorite quote: “It’s a shame that humans bond so effectively over gossip that can destroy someone so easily.”

wall

Book List: Unbeknownst to me, August was Women in Translation 66016-witmonth3252btext1Month which was created to  “Increase the dialogue and discussion about women writers in translation”. Our list this week is via Maclehose Press   and features such countries as Portugal, Italy, Germany, and Mozambique in its list of books by women. We have some catching up to do! Next year we’ll be ready.

 

And our poem of the week is by Laurel Blossom. Big thanks to Laurel for granting permission to post her poem, Radio. I’m dedicating this poem to my dear friend, Harriet, whose car was stolen a few days ago.

Radio

No radio
in car

No radio on board

No radio
Already stolen

Absolutely no radio!

Radio broken
Alarm is set
To go off

No radio
No money

No radio
No valuables

No radio or
valuables
in car or trunk

No radio
Stolen 3X

No radio
Empty trunk
Empty glove compartment
Honest

In car
Nothing of value

No radio
No nuthin
(No kidding)

Radio Broken
Nothing Left!

Radio Gone
Note Hole in Dashboard

Warning!
Radio Will Not Play
When Removed
Security Code Required

Would you keep
Anything valuable
On this wreck?

No valuables
In this van

Please do not
Break in
Unnecessarily

Thank you
For your kind
Consideration

Nothing of value
in car
No radio
No tapes
No telephone

_______________________

Don’t forget to check out our Pinterest board during the week for more Hot Reads and have a great reading week!

What I’m Thinking About Today: Jeans

Jeans. I bought a pair yesterday and was so excited that they fit exactly how I wanted them to fit. The tag said, “high rise, skinny fit”. I liked the sound of high rise because I’m sick, sick, sick of low rise pants that wiggle down your hips with every step you take. I don’t like feeling like they’re going to end up around my ankles if I don’t  keep tugging them up and I’m sick of having to tug them up. I’m so happy the style of pants is going back up and less down so women aren’t forced into buying low rise. I was skeptical about the “skinny fit” part because I’m certainly not skinny but I figured it was worth a try. I liked the dark wash and the fact that the front pockets were deep enough to be useable. Designers take note: skimpy pockets suck. Anyway, they fit like a glove and I’m happy.

It feels like I’ve been shopping for the perfect pair of jeans my whole life. I imagine I’ve owned literally hundreds of jeans over my lifetime. When I was a teen in the ’70′s I wasn’t so picky about them even though I wore them almost every day of my life, then. But, in the ’70′s no one was picky about what they wore. Everyone wore jeans, some kind of tee, peasant or baby doll top and Earth shoes. Remember Earth shoes? I bought a pair of shoes yesterday, too, that looked like the old Earth shoes except they have a tall wedge heel. They’re comfortable and adorable. But back to jeans…..

My best friend when I was 17 or so had a pair of jeans that I coveted. There were so many patches on the booty that there was probably no actual denim fabric there. I thought she looked so cool and I wanted them so bad and finally one day she gave them to me. On me they were tight whereas on her they had been slouchy-cool. It wasn’t the same but I wore them for a while until I got tired of feeling like a stuffed sausage.  Around that time I had another pair that I loved and wore a lot. They were faded denim, frayed bottom and had a red weenie dog patch on the knee.

All my friends and I had maybe two or three pairs of jeans but tended to wear a favorite pair most of the time. We would take wet washcloths and hand scrub over the legs to get some of the dirt off then put them right back on. It took too much time to wash and dry them in the machines and we were too impatient to wait.

I’m reading a book right now about clothes and the relationship women have with their clothes called “Women in Clothes” by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits, and Leanne Shapton. The authors interviewed and surveyed over 600 women during their research and the book if just filled with all kinds of great stories and photos. It was released yesterday (September 4) and I’ll be reviewing it here in the near future.

So I think the book is why I’m thinking of the jeans I bought yesterday and wondering if the style is appropriate for a woman in her 50′s. Maybe, maybe not. All I know is they’re comfortable, stylish and they make me feel good. They’re part of my style. I’m keeping them.

With my niece in my favorite jeans, 1987

With my niece in my favorite jeans, 1987

Charlotte’s Top Five + 3 For Lagniappe: Oscar Fashion

Last night was the Oscars and, as usual, I was tantalized by all the glitz and glitter. However, I skipped my ritual of watching E! for the pre-show red carpet arrivals in favor of a restorative nap while nursing an earache. I woke up feeling a bit better and settled in for what we know is always a looooong (and often boring) viewing of the Oscar show. I was glad to see Ellen hosting this year again. She is the only host that can make jokes that are actually funny instead of cringe-inducing. I love Ellen.

One non-fashion Oscar thought: I was happy to see 12 Years a Slave win Best Picture. It’s the first time a film shot predominately in New Orleans has won the Best Picture catagory.

Now on to my fashion  picks from The Academy Awards 2013.

cateblanchettCate Blanchette is my Number 1 pick for Best Dress. This gorgeous, spangly nude and white Armani fit her like a glove. Her earrings, hair and makeup complimented this dazzling look perfectly. Cate never disappoints and is one of my personal style icons.

Naomi-Watts-Oscars-2014#2 is Naomi Watts. This is another beautiful white dress, by Calvin Klein this time, that was tailored to Naomi’s body perfectly. White dresses can often come off as too bridal but both of these dresses avoided that cliche and just made these women look stunning. And I couldn’t take my eyes off her stunning diamond necklace.

Lupita.Prada

Lupita Nyong’o also made my best of the Golden Globes and her Oscar look didn’t disappoint. This flowing blue Prada is my third best pick. It was like a breath of fresh air and I’m sure headbands will be the next “new” thing for hair adornment.

sandra.mcqueen

Sandra Bullock looked very goddess-like in this #4 pick navy draped  number by Alexander McQueen. Doesn’t she have the most gorgeous hair and eyes ever?

meryl-streep_200852315865.jpg_gallery_max

What can you say about Meryl? Always classy, always impeccably dressed on the red carpet. This black and white Lanvin is pure, understated elegance. It may be my #5 pick but Meryl will always be my #1 favorite actress.

I think the fashion in general was really great at the Oscars this year and I didn’t see too much I didn’t like so I’ve only picked one look that didn’t make the grade, IMO.

glenn.zacposen

Sadly, Glenn Close is my pick for worst dressed. She wore a black Zac Posen dress which reminded me of an 1800′s widow,  all buttoned up from neck to toe on her way to the funeral- one long column of depressing black. There was nothing of the sophisticated black dress in this one for me.

johnandgayle

John Ridley (screenwriter of 12 Years a Slave) and wife Gayle get my nod for best dressed couple. I love his grey on black combo, very sleek, and her purple dress is beautiful on her. They compliment each other so nicely.

jared

Finally, for best dressed man I pick Jared Leto in this slightly unconventional look. The slim black pants are perfectly tailored, the white jacket is very Rat Pack and I love the pop of red bow tie. All together he looks hot, hot, hot in Saint Laurent.

Who were your  favorite picks?

Charlotte’s Top & Bottom Fives: Golden Globes Fashion

I love awards shows. There, I said it. I love them primarily for the fashion and I always watch E! for the pre-show red carpet. This year I thought much of the fashion was underwhelming but there are always a few stars that stand out from the rest. Here are my top five picks for the best fashion, listed from #5 to #1.

julliannaJulianna Margulies in Andrew Gn – Classic perfection.

 elisabethElisabeth Moss in J.Mendel – love this art deco-inspired dress. (But I would have picked another shoe.)

lupitaLupita Nyong’o in Ralph Lauren – just stunning. The color is beautiful against her skin and I love the caped look.

zooeyZoey Deschanel in Oscar de la Renta – Beautiful from head to toe, a total knock-out look. The beaded crop top made this look so fresh.

michelleMichelle Dockery in Oscar de la Renta

Michelle is my #1 pick because she looks so flawlessly effortless in this beautiful taupe dress with gold embellishment. This could have been just another strapless dress that we see over and over again at awards shows but the high/low hem, the gold embellishment and the perfect fit elevated it to a superior level. Her shoes and jewelry are perfectly understated highlighting  her peaches and cream complexion. I love this classy look.

And then there were the not-so-good looks. Again, from #5 to #1, here are my picks for the bottom five fashionistas.

juliaJulia Roberts in Dolce and Gabbana looks like she’s wearing her husband’s shirt under a strapless gown. Messy.

annaAnna Gunn in a Donna Karan dress that’s the same color as her skin. She’s beige from head to toe.

ediefalcoEdie Falco in a big orange bow…..I mean, Lanvin. I’m sorry to say this but the fabric looks like cheap, shiny poly.

jenniferJennifer Lawrence in a bound toilet paper roll…..I mean, Dior. I’m so disappointed in this dress.

zoeZoe Saldana in a friend’s design.

I have to give Zoe props for being sweet and wearing her friend’s design but, my goodness, what a mess of a dress. It looks like repurposed stripper lingerie bits and pieces. I saw her interviewed on the red carpet on E! where she over-explained why she was wearing it at all. Poor thing.

And, for a little lagniappe:

kerry Kerry Washington in Balenciaga, most beautiful pregnant woman.

 

naomiandliev Naomi Watts (wearing another dress I loved by Tom Ford) and Liev Schreiber, most beautiful couple.

 

usherUsher in Calvin Klein, best dressed beautiful man. (But, of course, I’m prejudiced because I like him so much.)

So,who were your picks?

Nola Fashion Week A/W 2013

One of my favorite things in the word has to be fashion. I absolutely adore it! The creativity is what I love. It’s all about the art of you and your specific personality.  Imagine my excitement when Nola Fashion Week (NOLAFW) got started in 2011.  NOLAFW is the next best thing to getting to the Mercedes Benz Fashion Week, but probably with a little more flavor.

Nola Fashion Week was the brainchild of the  Nola Fashion Council, whom work to connect designers with resources and exposure throughout the South and beyond. The Nola Fashion Council puts on NOLAFW biannually not only to showcase Southern talent, but to offer industry based education workshops as well as access to local designers and retailers.

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Southern born and /or based designers come together to show their greatness and to in my opinion put a smile on my face. From the efforts of Nola Fashion Week, we’ve come to know and see the rise of phenomenal designers such as Amanda deLeon, Andrea Loest, Matthew Arthur, Jolie & Elizabeth and more. It’s quite amazing to watch the talent right here at home doing innovative things.

Happening this week is Nola Fashion Week A/W 13’ showing. Showcasing this year is 17 designers which include Amanda deLeon, Andrea Loest, Anthony Ryan, Blackout, By Smith, Ella ose, Fair Fit, Hazel & Forange, Iacono, Izavel , Jolie  Elizabeth, Libellule , Loretta Jane, Matthew Arthur, Noel Martin, The Dope.Game and Tallulah’s Designs. These designers will not disappoint with great pieces you will daydream about for days as well as ready to wear pieces you will probably find at local stores this year! Also on the schedule are several cool workshops such as Sustainable Dyeing so you can get your learning on.

The great thing about NOLAFW is there is something for everyone! In whatever way you want to get involved from financial support to volunteering, to retail therapy and more; its something for you with NOLAFW. Not only are our brightest designers showcased, but also all the amazing individuals based right down in Louisiana making things happen behind the scene from makeup artist to stylist, to bloggers and more. This state produced a talented bunch and NOLAFW proves it just by the high value production put on since the beginning.

I don’t co-sign most events, but I look forward to NOLAFW each year and can’t get enough of the Nola and Southern Talent.

A Short, Gratuitous Fashion Post

Probably the main reason I watch awards shows is for the fashion. Back in the day I worked in fashion and knew what was on-trend and what was “out”. I read Women’s Wear Daily and Vogue and wore 4 inch heels to work every day.

Now I live real and I get my gratuitous fashion fix vicariously on Emmy night or Oscar night or any other of those nights when the beautiful show their stuff. Nothing makes a woman look more feminine and glamorous than getting dolled up in a long dress with full tilt make-up and jewelry. So, just for fun, here’s a few pics of my favorite looks from Sunday night’s Emmy Awards via Jezebel. (Click to enbiggen.)
I’ll leave the worst looks and best laughs to Joan.

 

Kat Dennings – beautifully styled with killer jewelry and perfect hair and nails.

Christina Hendricks – the only woman alive who can wear this color and look stunning. Of course, she could wear a brown paper bag and look stunning.

Heidi Klum – LOVE this color, the style, the flowiness. Love the shoes. Hate the Farah Fawcett hair.

My pick for best dress – worn by Leslie Mann. Fresh, young, exciting. Love the turquoise jewelry as contrast. This is definitely my style.

 

 

 

Where’d ya get dem shoes?

For many NOLA women the Krewe of Muses, an all women krewe, is the Parade Not To Be Missed and catching one of their fantastic decorated shoes is highly desired. Here are a few photos of Muses shoes for 2012 decorated by the Über Talented Wendy Westfaul. Click here for more shoe pics and to see Wendy’s creative process. Watch this space for photos from this years Muses parade which is tomorrow night!

Bayou Salvage & NOLAFemmes Partner For a Giveaway

In Honor of her birthday Bayou Salvage is sponsoring a giveaway!

 

French Market Bag by Bayou Salvage

 

Perfect for a few pounds of this season’s Satusmas, or school books, or pints of gin. Whatever your poison, this bag can handle it. Strong super soft and sturdy 100% repurposed burlap jute blend. Lined in cream or light colored canvas as available and secured with velcro. Measures 14 wide by 16 tall. 19 inch strap. Handmade with care in the city that care forgot. Bayoufabulous!

French Market Bags have:

* Highest quality fabric sourced from eco friendly and/or local purveyors
* Double stitched for strength and durability
* All seams serged to prevent fraying
* Secured with velcro
* Pockets- 2 of them large and roomy!
* Lined in a variety of neutral fabrics as shown. Each is handmade with care and one of a kind
* Dry clean/ spot clean wool & jute totes, machine wash on cool, dry flat for all others.

This gorgeous French Market tote made of burlap and jute can be yours with just a few simple qualifications:

-To enter leave a comment on this post. Winner will be drawn on Tuesday, October 19th.

-For additional entries, follow
this blog (via email subscription option or Networked Blogs option in the sidebar), & mention this Giveaway on your blog or on Twitter, and let me know you did in a separate comment.

-If you already follow me, mention that and I will add an additional entry.

Good luck, everyone!

To learn more about Bayou Salvage read our interview with creator Kerry Fitts.