Old Indie Theatre: “Another Happy Day”

ahdI like watching movies, especially obscure little indie movies that almost no one’s heard of or, at least, that I haven’t heard of. Recently I watched “Another Happy Day” (2011) a dark comedy starring Ellen Barkin, Ellen Burstyn, Thomas Haden Church, Demi Moore, Kate Bosworth, George Kennedy, and, one of my favorite good-bad guy actors, Ezra Miller. The film is written and directed by Sam Levinson who won the 2011 Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award at the Sundance Film Festival for this film. I chose this movie strictly based on a great cast, only knowing it was about a large family getting together for a wedding. Ha! It was far from a simple family dramady.

The story is about a family week-end in Annapolis where the estranged son of mom Lynn (Barkin) is getting married at the estate of the Grandparents (Burstyn and Kennedy). Lynn arrives with her two sons in tow, a 17-year old who is a volatile, wise-ass druggie who’s just come home from his 5th rehab stay (Miller) and a 13 year old who has (a little bit of) Asperger’s. A daughter (Bosworth), a cutter, joins the family later. Lynn’s two sisters, their husbands and kids are already there and immediately you sense the hostility and derision they have for Lynn and her kids and you see this throughout most of the movie.  Lynn has hopes for a happy reunion with her betrothed son whom she has seen very little over the years because he lives with her first husband and his wife Patty (Moore), an aggressive, aging trophy wife and (allegedly) ex-stripper.

If you think you have a crazy, dysfunctional family you really should watch this film. This is the most f-bombed up family I’ve ever seen and it made me feel ecstatic that mine is so tame! Lest you think this film sounds depressing it actually isn’t. These characters are multi-layered, complicated, issue-driven and tragically comical, at times.AnotherHappyDay_2 Miller’s portrayal of the cynical druggie son vacillates between chuckle-inducing smart-ass juvenile humor and plain old selfish meanness that makes you want to slap the shit out of him. Demi Moore’s portrayal of second wife Patty is the typical middle-ageing beauty who wants everyone to think she’s still hot but she is one cray-cray drama queen who appears to have everyone fooled. I looked everywhere to find a photo of her in her black step-mom-of-the-groom dress with a huge  white ruffle down the back that looks like a dragon tail but this is the best I could find. (See the trailer below!)another-happy-day_404930_10498 The dynamics between her and Lynn could be a hit “reality” TV show.

The people in this family have so many layers of issues and craziness that they could fill their own DSM. Not a moment of this film is boring and I think you will find yourself, like me, exclaiming over and over “this family is so effed up!” The acting is superb, especially Barkin whose every emotion plays across her face like a symphony.

I could write so, so much about this movie but I won’t because I want you to watch it yourself. It’s a  movie about love, hate, heartbreak, life, death, teenage problems, mental and emotional disorders, marriages, and of course, family. It’s a great story with great actors and great dialog. What more could you want?

 

Good Times/Bad Times: May 25 – 31

Today I have for you (channeling the chefs on “Chopped” which I just finished watching!) a little list of some of the good things and bad things that I read on the internet in the past week. Most of them are from other blogs, some from NOLA, some not. It’s just a hodge-podge of articles that I liked or …… didn’t, but all are decidedly shareable.

Good Times

Road trip! Follow Ian McNulty on a trip down the bayou to Terrebone Parish in Bayou Country journey offers glimpse of small-town life at the end of the line.

Local blogger Blathering shares her recent outing to City Park’s Botanical Gardens with a walk through Enrique Alferez’s sculptures in her weekly feature “Arty Tuesday”.

“Blackberries Everywhere” , via Bouillie blog, takes us along to pick wild blackberries in rural Louisiana and adds a bonus of a recipe for Blackberry Cornmeal Cake that sounds scrumptious. The photos of the finished cake made my mouth water and put it on my list of recipes to try this summer.

I’m always complaining to myself that I don’t have the kind of time I’d like to read. This is really not exactly true since I often  end up surfing the internet when my intention was to read my ebook.  I even tweeted about it. So I was happy to find this post, 7 tips to help you read more (& love it).

 Bad Times

Local political journalist John McGinnis died last Sunday at the age of 66. Robert Mann penned a wonderful memoir and tribute to Mr. McGinnis here,  a worthy read about an exceptional journalist.

#YesAllWomen was a hashtag on fire on Twitter this past week. It apparently first popped up Friday 5/23 in the aftermath of the Elliot Rodger shooting spree in California in response to his misogynist rants on YouTube. When social media takes up a cause like this, I find it much more interesting and enlightening to read personal blogs written by everyday people to get a feel for how the issue affects or is affecting everyday people. Here are a few blog posts I read this week that touched me (to tears in some cases) and/or just made me think in a different way, breaking open the festering sore of misogyny.

First, here’s a link to a Vanity Fair article that includes a graphic showing how the hashtag spread worldwide.

Brandi writes a very personal account of her experience of being bullied by a boy (and, yes, it was bullying)  at age 11. I really identified with this post because I experienced the same thing at the same age and I remember the humiliation I felt.

Roxane Gay’s post, In Relief of Silence and Burden, is a heartbreaker written in the unmistakably honest voice that is Roxane Gay. Reading this made my stomach hurt.

Walking While Fat and Female – Or Why I Don’t Care Not All Men Are Like That was an eye-opener. I guess I’m naive but it never occurred to me that adult men acted this way.

And, from the men:

My Girl’s a Vegetable: A Father’s Response To Isla Vista Shootings  in Luna Luna Magazine shares how a dad’s eyes were opened to the every day misogyny directed to women via his daughter’s experience while walking home from school.

Local Blogger Ian McGibboney writes “A Letter To All the Nice Guys”and makes some really good points.

And, finally, Emily Shire says “#YesAllWomen Has Jumped the Shark” and wonders if it’s being diluted by people tweeting about such things as “complaints about women being told to smile”. What do you think?

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New-To-Me Blog of the Week

To end on a lighter note, I want to share a blog each week (or so) that’s new to me and that I enjoyed reading  – you know, show a little link love.This week it’s  The Art of Simple, a blog that shares ways to live a simpler, more meaningful life as well as giving great organizational tips. Give it a click, I think you’ll like it!

 

 

 

 

 

About Women

Recently I was reading through the archives of  Women’s Voices For Change  when I came across a post that included this video of Dustin Hoffman talking about his preparation for his role in Tootsie (which I apparently missed when it first aired). He talks about how he realized that he had been editing the women he chose to pursue relationships with based on looks and how that knowledge has changed him. Take a look.

Maya Angelou: You Will Be Missed

Maya Angelou passed away this morning. The world will be a darker place without her but it could be lighter if we’d take her words to heart. This video of her is a favorite of mine. What wisdom she possessed.

 

Home

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Edie and the aunts never went anywhere. Libby had scarcely even been outside Mississippi; and she and the other aunts were gloomy and terrified for days if they had to venture more than a few miles from home. The water tasted funny, they murmured; they couldn’t sleep in a strange bed; they were worried that they’d left the coffee on, worried about their houseplants and their cats, worried that there would be a fire or someone would break into their houses or that the End of the World would happen while they were away. They would have to use commodes in filling stations—commodes which were filthy, with no telling what diseases on them. People in strange restaurants didn’t care about Libby’s saltfree diet. And what if the car broke down? What if somebody got sick? ~ Donna Tartt, “The Little Friend”

 

I mentally clapped hands in delight when I read that passage because it was so achingly familiar. Who in the South doesn’t know someone like that and  it’s not necessarily your little Great Aunt either. I read this out loud to someone and we both giggled over knowing people just like this.

Southerners love home. We love our big old creaky houses that have been in the family for generations, our meandering country roads, our lush, verdant yards in the summertime.  We love waking up in the morning with the sunlight streaming through the window playing tag on MawMaw’s quilt, going out on the porch with coffee and newspaper and the background melodies of Cardinals and Mocking Birds. The dew shines on the old roses like a brand new life and the ancient oaks stretch their arms to hug the world. We love our homeplace, our stuff, our familiar and comforting lives.

Risk-takers can have their adventures. We don’t necessarily have to leave home to have ours.

This passage is just a small bit from “The Little Friend”. Donna Tartt’s Mississippi roots (She’s from Greenville.) dig deep into this story with characters, situations and conversation that are familiar to those of us who grew up in the rural deep South. So far, reading this book is like walking back into my childhood for a visit. I may never want this book to end.

No to Demo of Historical Canal St/Tchoupitoulas Buildings!

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For historical info and how to contact the City Council click here. The council vote is this Thursdsy, May 22.  Let your voice be heard!

Marigny Neighborhood Assn Tour and B&B Awareness Campaign

Basic FMIA Home Tour Flyer

The home tour will also launch an awareness campaign, “Won’t you B&B my neighbor?”, designed share information about licensed B&B and Guest House best practices, the positive contributions these businesses bring to the Marigny and the city, as well as problems and issues surrounding illegal short term rentals, not just in the Marigny neighborhood, but throughout New Orleans. 

The FMIA is working with the Professional Innkeepers Association of New Orleans (PIANO), and others, to provide information regarding economic impact as well as quality of life and safety issues. Here are just a few points and counter points for consideration:

  • Legal B&B’s and Guest Houses contribute hundreds of thousands of dollars each year in taxes and fees that go directly into the city’s coffers to support infrastructure and city wide services.

  • Legally operating establishments are owner-occupied, insuring guests are well behaved and respectful of neighbors, insurance is compliant with property use, and help maintain the integrity of the neighborhood via owners’ vested interest in quality of life issues affecting the area.

  • Owner-occupied establishments retain legislative representation via residency census data for the area and maintain an integral voter base able to take action on important city and state matters.   

  • Illegal B&B’s and short term rentals in the area represent an untapped resource of taxes that is estimated to be well over $1M each year (and that figure is growing). 

  • Illegal establishments artificially inflate rentals, reduce rental inventory, create absentee owner issues such as lack of vested interest and oversight, and destroy the integrity of the neighborhood with constant flow of visitors/strangers, disrupting a stable residential neighborhood.

  • Illegal establishments impact city services without direct compensation, are most likely underinsured, may present safety and liability issues, and, bottom line, are against the law

FMIA is also promoting an upcoming city wide informational session and calls for the city to take action against illegal short term rentals. The meeting will be held on Tuesday, May 20, 7 p.m., at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 2624 Burgundy Street. More info about illegal short term rentals.

Visit http://www.faubourgmarigny.org/ for more information.

Faubourg Marigny Improvement Association (FMIA) is a non-profit organization founded in 1972 to preserve the quality of life in the Faubourg Marigny, protect the natural and built environment, and provide a vision for the neighborhood’s future.

Glass Woman Prize: Supporting Women’s Writing

Well, National Poetry Month is over and I’m pleased with myself for writing as much poetry as I did. I posted new poems 22 out of 30 days which is the best I’ve done for NaPoWriMo, ever. Last year I didn’t even attempt it so I feel good about this year’s effort. Not that I think all the poems were good ones, but the exercise made me stretch, made me write when I didn’t feel inspired on my own, made me think hard. I had to look for something to inspire, something I don’t do on a regular basis. The NaPoWriMo website was helpful as was reading the work of other poets that gave me ideas or nudged my memory about long-forgotten events. It was a good thing.

A big thing (for me) that happened in April was that I was notified I was a finalist for the 15th Glass Woman Prize for my micro-fiction piece “Something About SW”. I was astonished! I had no idea anything of mine was up for consideration. The Glass Woman Prize is curated by Beate Sigriddaughter to encourage women writersto acknowledge, transparently, who we are, and that who we are is not trivial and unimportant, despite the fact that it is not typically rewarded in a man-made and money-motivated world.

Stats from the website:

As of April 2014:

$10,430 prizes went to 41 prize winners, including $430 in anonymous donations.

5905 direct submissions were read, and an additional estimated 1000 from sources other than direct submissions.

116 stories were posted or linked to the Glass Woman Prize page.

I am honored to be a part what Beate has built and is continuing to build. The winner of the 15th Glass Woman Prize is “Simulacra” by J.P. Reese which I first read on Fictionaut where I commented, “I don’t like how this makes me feel which is what makes it so brilliant.” And I meant it. A good story doesn’t have to make you feel good, it has to make you feel and this story makes you feel, big-time.

I urge you all to go to the GWP page and read the winner’s and finalist’s work and read Beate’s own work, which is phenomenal. The level of talent Beate has gathered for the GWP is amazing and the work is powerful and inspiring. Again, I am in awe of what Beate has done for women’s writing. I hope you will give her your support by reading the work.